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Posts Tagged ‘Onyx Plus’

In recent months Akuna has been working long and hard to make significant improvements that would drive your business, allow you to further develop and grow your organization, and of course, maximize your profits.

It is Akuna’s pleasure to introduce some exciting changes for Akuna Canada /USA Inc. effective as of this February 2011:

1.  Prices of all products have been reduced by 25% (of retail cost)!

  • A case of Alveo has been reduced from $240.00 to $180.00.
  • A case of Onyx Plus has been reduced from $160.00 to $120.00.
  • A set of Take a Plaster has been reduced from $88.00 to $75.00.

2.  New discount system has been introduced:

  • 140 – 420 points = 20% discount
  • 421 – 1400 points = 25% discount
  • 1401 points – more = 30% discount

3.  New Welcome Pack has been introduced

4.  New Gold Pack has been introduced

5.  New bonuses and exciting incentives for all distributors!

6.  Simplified ways to become a Leader faster!

7.  New bonus price is now $0.4125 per point.

Akuna hopes that these changes will serve as tools to help you effectively expand your independent Akuna business.

You may download  New Compensation Plan 2011

 

Until next time…stay healthy

Katarzyna

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Akuna is pleased to inform you that Onyx Plus has been launched in Canada.

Onyx Plus t is an advanced-formula multi-mineral supplement that delivers essential minerals such as magnesium, calcium, phosphorus and zinc in a liquid form that is easy for the body to absorb, process and utilize. The minerals in Onyx Plus will strengthen your bones and immune system and reduce the risks of illnesses such as diabetes, cancer and kidney disease.

To celebrate the launch of Onyx Plus on the Canadian market, Akuna has created three special offers, valid in both Canada and the USA.

For more information click  Onyx Plus now available in Canada

Until next time…Stay healthy

Katarzyna

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Zinc

Zinc formulations have been used since the time of Ancient Egyptians to enhance wound healing.  The clinical significance in human nutrition and public health was recognized relatively recently.  It’s deficiency in humans was first describes in 1961, when the consumption of diets with low zinc was associated with “adolescent nutritional dwarfism” in the Middle East.  Since then, the deficiency of zinc has been recognized by a number of experts as an important public health issue, especially in developing countries.

Zinc is also an essential trace element for all forms of life.  As it is necessary for the functioning of over 300 different enzymes and plays a vital role in an enormous number of biological processes.

Numerous aspects of cellular metabolism are zinc-dependant.  Zinc plays important roles in growth and development, the immune response, neurological function, and reproduction, in the structure of proteins and cell membranes.

The immune system is adversely affected by even moderate degrees of zinc deficiency.  It was found that severe zinc deficient depresses the immune function.  Zinc is required for the development and activation of T-lymphocytes, a kind of white blood cell that helps fight infection.  When zinc supplements are given to individuals with low zinc levels, the numbers of T-cells lymphocytes circulating in the blood increase and the ability of lymphocytes to fight infection improves.  Zinc supplements are often given to help heal skin ulcers or sores, but they do not increase rates of wound healing when zinc levels are normal.

There is no single laboratory test that adequately measures zinc’s nutritional status.  Medical doctors who suspect a zinc deficiency will consider risk factors such as inadequate caloric intake, alcoholism, digestive diseases, and symptoms such as impaired growth in infants and children when determining a need for zinc supplementation.  Vegetarians may need as much as 50% (1.8 mg/daily) more zinc than non-vegetarians because of the lower absorption of zinc from plant foods, so it is very important for vegetarians to include good sources of zinc in their diet.

Zinc is found in oysters, and to a far lesser degree, in most animal proteins, beans, nuts, almonds, whole grains, pumpkin and sunflower seeds.  A turkey’s neck and beef’s chunk or shank also contains significant amount of zinc.  Phytates, which are found in whole grain breads, cereals, legumes and other products, have been known to decrease zinc absorption.  Fortunately, a healthy diet can provide you with as much zinc as you need.  However, the truth of the matter is that only about 30% of the zinc that you intake can get absorbed by your body.

Chromium

Chromium is a mineral that humans also require in trace amounts, although its mechanisms of action in the body and the amounts needed for optimal health are not well defined.

Although trivalent chromium is recognized as a nutritionally essential mineral, scientists are not yet certain exactly how it functions in the body.

Chromium has long been of interest for its possible connection to various health conditions.  Among the most active areas of chromium research is its use in supplement form to treat diabetes, lower blood lipid levels, promote weight loss, and improve body compositions.

It is believed that chromium affects glucose metabolism by enhancing the effects of insulin.  Insulin is secreted be specialized cells in the pancreas in response to increased blood glucose levels, such as after a meal.  A decreased response to insulin or decreased insulin sensitivity may result in impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes.  However, the value of chromium supplements for diabetics is inconclusive and controversial.  Randomized controlled clinical trails in well-defined, at-risk populations where dietary intakes are known, are needed to determine the effects of chromium on markers of diabetes.

The effects of chromium supplementation on blood lipid levels in humans are also inconclusive.  The mixed research findings may be due to difficulties in determining the chromium status of subjects at the start of the trails and the researchers’ failure to control for dietary factors that influence blood lipid levels.

Some claim that chromium supplements reduce body fat and increase lean (muscle) mass.  Yet a recent review of numerous studies that examined the effects of 200 to1,000g/day of chromium on body mass or composition found no significant benefits.  Another recent review of randomized, controlled clinical trails did find supplement of chromium picolinate to help with weight loss when compares to placebos, but the differences where small and of debatable clinical relevance.

Chromium I widely distributed in the food supply, but most foods provide only small amounts.  Processed meats, whole grain products, ready-to-eat bran cereals, green beans, broccoli, and species are relatively rich in chromium; however the content of the mineral is substantially affected by agricultural and manufacturing process.

Absorption of chromium from the intestinal tract is low, ranging from less than 0.4% to 2.5% of the amount consumed, and the reminder is excreted through bodily waste.  Vitamin C and niacin might enhance the mineral’s absorption.  Absorbed chromium is then stored in the liver, spleen, soft tissue, and bone.

 

Until next time…Stay Healthy

  

Katarzyna

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How much do you know? By Milan Frohlich, MSc., A.Sc.T., R&D Scientist Akuna Regulatory Affairs Coordinator

We have all heard at some point or another that minerals are important to our health.  However, not all of us are sure of why this is the case.  This lack of information may be a factor why an estimated 90% of North Americans suffer from a mineral deficiency or imbalance. 

Thanks to the extensive research conducted regarding the relationship between minerals and our health, it has become evident that sustaining a balanced level of minerals in every organ, tissue and cell of the human body may be prominent key to maintaining a healthy existence.  Unfortunately in today’s world, naturally occurring, nutrient-rich foods are becoming a thing of the past.  Fortunately, thanks to all this research and development, we can turn to nutritional supplements to support our health.

We tend to hear a lot about minerals such as calcium and magnesium but are often not familiar with the importance of some of these minerals which our bodies also require.  Trace minerals or trace elements are generally, uncommon minerals that practically all organisms need in minute quantities in order to trigger the production of enzymes and hormones for growth, reproduction and health maintenance of the animal or plant body. 

Nutritionally speaking, trace minerals by definition are those which are required by the human body in micro amount, i.e. in 100 milligrams (mg) dosages per day, or less.

Below is a closer look at three trace minerals, their function and their importance to the human body.

Manganese

The natural importance of manganese was discovered in 1936-37, when researches reported the development of bony malformation in poultry fed on a manganese-free diet.  Later studies also demonstrated the relationship of manganese to growth, bone development, reproduction, and the functioning of the central nervous system.

Manganese is an essential trace nutrient in all forms of life.  The human body contains about 10 to 20 mg of manganese, which is widely distributed throughout the tissues, stored mainly in liver and kidneys.  It plays an important role in a number of physiological processes as a constituent of some enzymes and an activator of their enzymes which are involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.  In combination with choline, it helps in the digestion and utilization of fat.

Manganese helps to nourish the nerves and brain and assist in the proper coordinative action between the brain, nerves and muscles in every part of the body.  It is also involved in normal reproduction and function of mammary glands.

On the other hand, manganese deficiency has been observed in a number of animal species.  Signs of manganese deficiency include impaired growth, impaired reproductive function, skeletal abnormalities, impaired glucose tolerance, and altered carbohydrate and lipid metabolism.  In humans, demonstration of a manganese deficiency syndrome has been less clear. 

A child on long-term total parenteral nutrition (fed intravenously) lacking manganese developed bone demineralization and impaired growth that were corrected by manganese supplementation.  However, the human body obtains sufficient manganese through normal dietary intake, so a deficiency syndrome is rare. 

It has been documented that women with osteoporosis have increased plasma levels of manganese and also an enhanced plasma response to an oral dose of manganese. Estimated average dietary manganese intakes range from 2.1 – 2.3 mg/day for men and 1.6 – 1.8 mg/day for women. 

People eating vegetarian diets and western diets emphasizing whole grains may have manganese include whole grains, nuts, leafy vegetables, and teas.  Foods high in phytic acid, such as beans, seeds, nuts, whole grains, and soy products, or foods high in oxalic acid, such as cabbage, spinach, and sweet potatoes, may slightly inhibit manganese absorption.

 

To be continued…

 

Until next time…Stay healthy

Katarzyna

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The health debate is on…

Dr. Jaromir Bertlik N.D.
Chairman of Scientific Advisory Board

One cannot deny the fact that good nutrition results in better health.  We are familiar with the dangers of trans-fats, preservatives, additives, coloring and high-sugar consumption in our diets; now, researches are pointing fingers to yet another potential health risk: the correlation between drinking cola and the weakening of bones.  Can the classic all-American refreshment be responsible for weakening our bones?  Research conducted in recent years leads to some surprising results…

In a Wall Street Journal article (October 16, 2007), Betsy McKay writes that some studies have linked the consumption of cola, the most popular soft drink, and poor bone-mineral density”.  A 1994 study based on 127 teenagers published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, and a 2000 study based on 460 high school students published in the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, both showed a connection “between consumption and bone fractures in physically active teen girls.  The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published a Tufts University study, which reported to have “measured bone density and analyzed eating habits” and which found a “significant impact on women who drank more than three colas a week”.  On the other hand, the researches in this study, which was funded by the US Department of Agriculture and the National Institute of Health, also showed “no evidence” that bone tissue is harmed by the “occasional” cola.

Taking all this research into account, the bottom line is best summarized by Katherine Tucker, an epidemiologist at Tuft University’s USDA Nutrition and the lead author of the cola study.  Tucker has simplified by stating “the more cola that women drank, the lower their bone mineral density was”.

Is Cola the Culprit?
While so many studies have found a correlation between cola consumption and weak bone density, scientists cannot agree on why this is the case.  Some argue that the caffeine, sugar, phosphoric acid and carbonation in cola impair calcium absorption in the bones.  One can take into consideration the sugar-factor alone; an average can of soda contains about ¼ cup of sugar!  Another reason cola is the culprit is due to its effect on insulin levels, which is augmented by the fact that sugar (along with caffeine) drains the body of B vitamins, magnesium and zinc.  Based on recent studies, certain B vitamins are thought to promote stronger bones by lowering homocysteine (an amino acid) levels, which would otherwise impair collagen’s ability to hold bones together.  Magnesium plays a role in calcium metabolism and zinc aids with collagen formation.  Together, the interruption of these functions sets the stage which results in the reduction of bone health.

The Ugly Truth…
The truth is that everyone is at risk of developing osteoporosis, irrelevant of gender.  This can be a debilitating disease and the resulting pain can lead to depression, restrictive ling disease (shortness of breath due to poor posture and squashed lungs) and ultimately, even pneumonia.  An estimated 52 million men and women aged 50 and above will have osteoporosis or be at an increased risk of having low bone mass by 2010 and by 2020, that number will skyrocket to 61 million.  In addition to osteoporosis patients are more likely to sustain hip fractures that those without the condition and further, “Approximately 20% of individuals with hip fractures will die the year after the fracture usually from surgery complications, such as pneumonia or blood clots in the lung”.  In fact, a woman’s risk of hip fracture is equal to her combined risk of developing breast, uterine and ovarian cancer.  Below are some important health statistics, related to men and women:

Men

  • Approximately 2 million men live with osteoporosis and there are still 12 million more at risk of developing the disease 
  • Osteoporosis progresses 12 years slower in a man than in a woman
  •  The medical community tends to ignore the prevalence of osteoporosis in men and are therefore less likely than women to be diagnose
  •  ¼ of all men over the age of 50 will experience an osteoporosis-related bone break

Women

  • While by their late 60’s men and women lose bone mass at similar rates, women face higher bone loss in their 50’s than men do
  • ½ of all women over the age of 50 will have an osteoporosis fracture before they die
  • After menopause, the risk for women – especially white and Asian with small0thin frames – of developing osteoporosis increases
  • 2% of college-aged women may already have osteoporosis and another 15% of women in this age group may have already lost significant bone density

True for both men and women

  • Smoking and excessive alcohol increases the risk of developing the disease.

How can you reduce the chances of osteoporosis?

  • The chances of developing osteoporosis can be sharply reduced through dietary restrictions and lifestyle changes – all of which would essentially     promote better health
  • The increased consumption of vegetables will positively result in increased antioxidants in the body
  • Always opt for low-glycemic nutrition
  • Exercise regularly and maintain a healthy weight because fat cells generate more inflammation
  • Akuna offers a comprehensive, preventive approach to health aging for men and women – see which products are right for you.

 

Until next time…Stay Healthy

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kostWhat does all this have to do with inflammation?

Blood sugar is controlled in a very narrow range.  Extra sugar molecules attach to a variety of proteins that in turn injure the blood vessel walls.  This is what I refer to as repeated injury to the blood vessel wall and this is what leads to inflammation.  When you “spike” your blood sugar level several times a day, every day, it is exactly like taking sandpaper and sanding down the walls of your delicate blood vessels.

But for now, let’s go back to the sweet roll: That innocent looking goody not only contains sugars, it is also baked in one of many omega-6 oils such as soybean.
Chips and fries are also soaked in soybean oil; processed foods are manufactured with omega-6 oils for longer shelf life. While omega-6s are essential to the human body as they are part of every cell membrane, controlling what goes in and out of the cell — they must be present in direct correlation and balance to the omega-3s.

If this balance shifts due to excess consumption of omega-6s, the cell membrane produces chemicals called cytokines that directly cause inflammation. Today’s mainstream western diet has produced an extreme imbalance of these two fats.  The ratio of imbalance ranges from 15:1 to as high as 30:1 in favor of the omega-6s.  That’s a tremendous amount of cytokines causing inflammation.  In today’s food environment, a 3:1 ratio would be optimal and healthy.

To make matters worse, the excess weight you acquire from eating these foods creates an overload of fat cells that in turn produce large quantities of pro-inflammatory chemicals adding to the injury which your body is already enduring.  The process that began with what seemed as an innocent sweet roll turns into a vicious cycle which over time creates heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and finally, as the inflammatory process continues unabated – Alzheimer disease.

Who would willfully expose him/herself repeatedly to harmful foods and other substances that are known to cause injury to our bodies?   Only smokers perhaps, but they made their choice willfully.  The rest of us are simply following the mainstream dietary recommendations and consuming foods that are low in fat and high in polyunsaturated fats and carbohydrates, completely oblivious to the fact that we are indeed causing repeated injury to our blood vessels. 

It is this repeated injury that creates the chronic inflammation leading to heart disease, stroke, diabetes and obesity. 

Let me repeat that: the injury, and subsequently, the inflammation in our blood vessels are caused by the low fat diet that has been recommended for years by mainstream medicine.

My recommendations:

  • Choose complex carbohydrates such as colorful fruits and vegetables.
  • Eliminate or at least cut down on the inflammation-causing omega-6 fats like corn and soybean oil and the processed foods that are made from them. Animal fats contain less than 20% omega-6s and are much less likely to cause inflammation than the supposedly “healthy polyunsaturated oils”.  The belief that saturated fat alone causes heart disease is just that: a belief and not a fact.  Actually the belief that saturated fat raises blood cholesterol at all is fairly weak itself.  Today, we now know that cholesterol is not the cause of heart disease, and therefore any concern about saturated fats simply sounds absurd.  As absurd as the fact that the whole cholesterol theory led to the no-fat/low-fat recommendations that in turn created the very foods which are currently causing the epidemic of inflammation.  We are now facing an epidemic of arterial inflammation leading to heart disease and other silent killers.
  • Choose the wholesome foods your grandmother served and not those of your mother which came from grocery shelves filled with manufactured and processed foods.  By eliminating inflammatory foods and adding essential nutrients from fresh unprocessed food to your diet, you can reverse the damage caused to your arteries and your body.
  • Choose AKUNA products to help eliminate and prevent inflammation and future disease and use them daily.  The ingredients in all Akuna products are natural; this means that our bodies can digest them in the correct physiological forms and many of the ingredients are also well known for their ability to eliminate toxins from the body.  In my naturopathic practice I have had unparalleled results with the Akuna products therefore I recommend regular use of Alveo and Take Plaster at the least.  However, if you have access to other Akuna products such as Onyx Plus, MasterVit, Pinky or Cleanse Plus, I also recommend the regular use of those.
  • Improve the quality of life for your children as well by improving their diets.

There is no escaping the fact that as we continue consuming prepared and processed foods, the more we expose ourselves to the risk and dangers of inflammation.  The human body cannot process, nor was it ever designed to process foods packed with sugars and soaked in omega-6 oils.  There is but one answer to quieting inflammation, and that is to return to consuming food close to its natural state.

With great health – Dr. Jaromir Bertlik

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What you need to know about bones and joins with Dr. Jari Bertlik

In addition to ensuring a pain-free and fully mobile life, maintaining our bones and joints in good health allows us to enjoy and extended youth. For this reason the importance of maintaining a healthy bone density and proper joint function must not be undermined. Well, what is the best way to take care of our bones and joints?
Just as with any other body organ of body system, proper nutrition – plays a major role…

 

Question: What are the most common forms of bone disease?
Dr. Bertlik: When it comes to bones we are not really talking about disease but rather about their strength and consistency. First of all, when we are young and growing, proper development and healthy growth of bones is vital; later, once we reach our 20’s and from then on, it is essential to continue maintaining our bone health, meaning their strength and density.

Q: How do we maintain proper bone health?
Dr. Bertlik: Nutrition is of course central to the maintenance of healthy bones. A balanced diet is the best method; foods that are abundant in minerals – nuts and seeds should not be forgotten. Some of the most important minerals when it comes to bone health are: magnesium, calcium and phosphorous. Since we do not live in ideal world and these minerals are not obtained from the foods we eat, supplementing our diet is a smart opinion. Not meeting our required daily intake of minerals can lead to and imbalance in our bodies which when not corrected, eventually leads to a loss in bone tissue and bone density.

Q: What else is essential to maintaining good bone health?
Dr. Bertlik: Also important, is maintain a proper hormonal balance. An estrogen deficiency, for example, can and will eventually result in an impaired absorption of calcium from our gastrointestinal system. The kidneys also become less efficient in conserving calcium. As a result, there is a relative decline in the available calcium in your blood. The body works at all costs to try and maintain the normal calcium levels. The human skeletal system is the major organ for calcium storage; and estrogen deficiency will cause the body to compensate for the relative decrease in available calcium from the gut and kidney by leaching calcium from our bones. Thus not only do bones become weaker because of the estrogen deficiency, they in turn lose more calcium. The best way to reduce the loss of calcium from our bones is to increase our calcium intake from either our diets or through calcium supplementation.

Q: Do women suffer more from osteoporosis then men? Why so?
Dr. Bertlik: Yes, statistically this is true. Men do not require or produce as much estrogen as women do. Therefore, they also tend to be less affected by an estrogen deficiency. Please note however that this is not to say that men cannot and do not suffer from Osteoporosis.

Q: What are some of the problems we experience with our joints?
Dr. Bertlik: Most often the problems we have with our joints, such as arthritis and rheumatism, begin with the accumulation of toxic materials, especially acids in our joint fluid. This causes our joints to become inflamed and eventually damages our joint structure and impairs our joint function. Joint problems and join conditions are more commonly experienced with age because as we get chronologically older, so do our joints.

Q: Is there any way to prevent or reduce the risk of these conditions?
Dr. Bertlik: A healthy way of life including good nutrition and regular exercise are of course key. Avoiding inflammations and infections in our bodies is also very important; therefore, we need to tend to our immune system by keeping our body clean of toxins. And of course maintaining the recommended intake of calcium, magnesium and phosphorous, as well as zinc and other trace minerals in our daily diets is of essence. All these essential minerals are contained in Onyx Plus but let me remind you once again, that unless your gastrointestinal tract is clean, no minerals will be absorbed properly.

Until next time…Stay Healthy

Katarzyna

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